Food Issues

What You Need To Know About The GMO Labeling Law

Coming soon, to a store near you….Act 120, or more commonly known as the Genetically Engineered (GE) Food Labeling Rule, officially goes into effect July 1st of this year. The topic created a lot of buzz about two years ago, when the Vermont Legislature passed the bill (H.112) into law in May 2014, allowing a two year period for implementation.

Country of Origin Labeling: What It Means for Us

The United States government, in response to consumers' desires to know more about the origin of the food they were buying, passed a law in 2002 called the Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) law.  The law aims to provide information to consumers regarding the origin of food products.  The 2002 Farm Bill (and subsequent amendments) requires processors, packers, and retailers to label the country of origin for fish and shellfish; peanuts, pecans, and macadamia nuts; ginseng; fresh and frozen fruits and vegetables; ground beef, lamb, pork, goat, and chicken; and muscle cuts of beef, veal, lamb,

Revisiting GMO Labeling

While the issue of GMO labeling has quieted down in Vermont since the Legislature adjourned for the year, the battle is still raging across the country, particularly in Washington State. At City Market we believe in fostering a community of well-informed citizens, and as such, believe that products should be labeled in ways that allow consumers to make informed choices based on their personal values and priorities.  So, in the midst of the calm, let’s take a moment to revisit the GMO labeling debate.

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