Health Notes

Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Herbs and Spices

By Robert Luby, MD

On June 6, City Market is offering a free class entitled “Anti-Inflammatory Diet.” The class filled up quickly so we’re offering a second class on June 19. Dr. Luby offers up some additional information to help you start your summer healthfully. Want additional information from the class (handouts and recipes)? Please email us at learn@citymarket.coop!

Note:While this article discusses, in part, the medicinal properties of various herbs and spices, it is not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

Inflammation in the body is a double-edged sword.  It is usually beneficial in short-term, acute conditions such as a laceration of the skin, a twisted ankle, or a response to the common cold virus.  However, if sustained over time, it can be harmful, as in the case of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and autoimmune conditions, which are all chronic inflammatory states.

June's Health Genie In-Depth: Nutritional & Botanical Support for Sufferers of Seasonal Allergies

By Heather Irvine, Wellness Buyer

Note:The informational in this article is not meant to be an exhaustive list and is based on the traditional uses of plants. Statements about the research have been simplified. This article is meant for informational purposes and it is not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

Many people suffer from seasonal allergies. Allergy symptoms occur when an individual’s respiratory and immune system are reactive to a particular foreign substance whether or not it is otherwise harmful. Below are some popular approaches to alternative allergy relief. While most of these approaches are not recognized by the FDA as therapeutic treatments for allergies, all have a long history of use and current research that supports this information. A few have potential negative interactions with medications; you should always check with your medical practitioner before starting a new remedy.

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May's Health Genie: Probiotics

Dear Health Genie,

I recently purchased an acidophilus probiotic supplement from the refrigerator in the wellness department. I assume I am supposed to refrigerate it at home. If warm temperatures are not good for the viability of the probiotic bacteria, then how is it going to live inside my GI tract?

Thanks
Probiotic Pete

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Phytonutrients

By Robert Luby, MD

Note: This article is not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

The term “phytonutrients” simply refers to natural chemicals found in plants that act as nutrients for human physiology.  A common distinction made between vitamins/minerals and phytonutrients is the following:  vitamins and minerals are essential for life.  While not essential to sustain life, phytonutrients promote optimal health.  There are more than 25,000 known phytonutrients, an estimated 10,000 of which may prevent disease.

April's Health Genie: Sunscreen

Dear Health Genie,

Every year I buy several different sunscreens thinking one may be better than the other. Even though I work outside, I end up with extra tubes left at the end of the summer. Some sunscreen has irritated my face but I didn’t have any way of knowing this until I’d purchased it. Now I choose a baby sunscreen because it doesn’t make me itchy or one for faces or one that sprays on because those feel lighter. I enjoy being tan so I choose a low or medium SPF, skip sunscreen some days, and around midsummer I stop using sunscreen except on the very brightest days. Is that ok once I am tan? Sometimes people who see my dark tan warn me that I should always cover up even if I don’t think I am getting burned. Is it safe to continue using the sunscreens I bought last year, this year? Will you advise me about what to look for on the label? I know about SPF. What else should I know? 

Thanks,
Outdoorsy Sun Lover

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