Health Notes

Fire Cider Controversy

Fire Cider ingredients

Note: These articles are not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

Fire cider is a vinegar infusion of warming herbs, such as ginger, horseradish, garlic and cayenne. It is a common cold and flu remedy, but can be used year round as a circulatory, immune, and digestive tonic. Shire City Herbals, a company out of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, was recently granted the copyright for Fire Cider, a traditional remedy that was neither created nor named by the company. They then issued cease and desist orders to companies that have been selling this product long before Shire City Herbals was created. Rosemary Gladstar has published the recipe for fire cider in several of her books and began teaching people how to make it over 35 years ago. Her teachings led to this remedy being made by thousands of herbalists over several decades.

March Health Genie: The Story of Probiotics

Probiotics

Note: These articles are not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

Whether it’s after a regimen of antibiotics, for digestive support, or aiding in immunity, many people seek a quality probiotic.  A common question that arises during the process of one’s decision to buy a probiotic is why are some products refrigerated and others not?  We covered this topic briefly a few years ago, but here is some additional information.

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Baby Care Product Safety: Getting Your Wee Ones Off to a Clean Start

Vermont baby

By Cristi Nunziata, Herbal Education Coordinator

A growing number of people are becoming more conscious about what they are putting in their bodies, buying only seasonal, local, organic, and non-GMO foods. But what about what we put on our bodies? And more importantly, on the bodies of our babies? While one would assume that baby care products consist of only the mildest and safest ingredients possible, unfortunately, that is not always the case.

February Health Genie: Oil Massage - the Key to Hydration and Warmth

Massage Oils

Note: This article is not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

For many, winter is a time filled with itchy dry skin, flaking scalp, cracked finger tips, and low immunity.  There is a simple, cheap, and enjoyable solution to these common problems: oil massage.  This technique, also known as Abhyanga, has been used for centuries and has many therapeutic applications. 

It is a great practice to pick up now, in the middle of the winter, as it is very hydrating. Most soaps and body washes strip the skin of its natural oils and leave the skin bare and scaly. Performing oil massage on a daily basis keeps the skin hydrated and protected. 

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Unlock Your Lover's Heart - with Chocolate

Chocolate

By Guido Masé, RH (AHG), Chief Herbalist at Urban Moonshine

Love, death, rebirth – such is the cycle of fertility and renewal. Perhaps none knew this better than the Mesoamerican cultures that dwelled in present-day Mexico and Central America. Over one thousand years ago, in the rainforest that covers the slopes of the mountains in Western Yucatán, a Maya ruler enshrined this allegory on the lid of his tomb – in a story told by plants.

Pakal the great, who ruled Palenque for over sixty years, is pictured in a state of transition: beneath him opens the mouth of the serpent of the underworld while above him, sprouting from his belly, a tree of life fills the sky. Pakal embodies the corn god, who dies, buries himself, and is reborn as magical plants: most notably, the cacao tree[i].

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