Health Notes

How to Eat Better in the New Year

Spicy Pork Peanut Noodles

Note: This article is not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before making any major changes to your diet or using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

By Robert Luby, MD

“You are what you eat” is a phrase that has become the basis of many New Year’s resolutions to eat a healthy diet.  When examined more closely however, it is only the case that “you are what you eat” if you fully digest and absorb that which you consume.  In other words “You are what you assimilate.”  What you are able to digest, absorb, and assimilate depends greatly on how you eat.  Therefore, the claim which will be made in this article is that “You are HOW you eat.

January Health Genie: Winter Warming Beauty Care

Himalayan Pink Salt

Note:This article is not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

Dear Health Genie,

For the holidays, a friend gifted me a lovely jar of homemade bath salts.  With the colder days, I am taking baths a few times a week and I’d like to make more bath salts before I run out.  Do you have any recipes to share?

Thank you,

Tinamarie

E-newsletter Features: 

December's Health Genie: Holiday Stress Relief

Nettles

Note:This article is not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

Dear Health Genie,

I am a fan of the holiday season and hosting holiday parties, however, my wife stresses easily this time of year.  We prepare together, but even with my help she is frantic and tense- especially if we are hosting her family.  Do you have any advice that could help make this season more relaxed and harmonious?  

Thanks,

Rudolph R.

E-newsletter Features: 

Start a New American Tradition: Bring Bitters to the Table

Urban Moonshine Bitters

By Guido Masé, RH (AHG), Chief Herbalist at Urban Moonshine

Come early evening, around six o’clock, when the sun is still strong but a cool breeze begins to lift the heat of the day, Italians gather at the local bar for aperitivi. Sitting under striped awnings, they sip from wine glasses full of a light, sparkling drink made from seltzer water and mild bitter preparations. The glasses vary in color from dark brown, through red, and into an almost electric orange, reflecting the ingredients they contain. These drinks are preferred over strong cocktails, and are really the beginning of the evening meal as they support digestion and can help prevent indigestion and heartburn. After the aperitivi, a short walk through narrow streets leads to the main restaurant, where the real eating begins: three, often four courses featuring rich cream and meat sauces, lots of prosciutto and thin cuts of beef, plenty of seafood and crisp vegetables. Visitors are often encouraged try aperitivi, as the rich (and abundant) combinations of food can be too much for the digestion, and the bitter drinks before meals really help.

November's Health Genie: Coconut Oil

Coconuts

Note:This article is not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

Hello Health Genie,

I know this is a common complaint, but nothing I’ve tried seems to really help.  I typically have pretty dry skin, but with the colder drier weather approaching, I just can’t seem to keep my skin hydrated.  I’ve heard that coconut oil can be effective, but I’ve never used it outside of the kitchen.  Can you tell me more about its medicinal properties?

Thank you,

Debbie Dry

E-newsletter Features: 

Pages