Health Notes

June Health Genie: Treating Muscle Soreness

Note: These articles are not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

Arnica Montana

Dear Health Genie,

I ran the Vermont City Marathon over Memorial Day Weekend, and my muscles took awhile to recover. In the future, what can I do to help them recover more quickly?

Thanks,
Runner Rita

 

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May Health Genie: Spring Edibles

Note: These articles are not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

Spring Edible Food

Anyone who has experienced a Vermont winter knows the excitement of spotting the first spring plants breaking through the thawing Vermont landscape.  And in an earthy, land-based, food conscious state like Vermont, many plant lovers are foraging their spring edibles and are eager to find the first of the fiddleheads at the market.  Here are some of the medicinal benefits to some of the most cherished spring sprouts:

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April Health Genie: Reviving Bitters

Urban Moonshine Bitters

Note: These articles are not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

Dear Health Genie:

I’ve been hearing a lot about bitters lately.  What are they and why should I use them?

Thanks,
Tessa Tonic

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Topical Treatments for Inflammation

Arnica

Note: While this article discusses, in part, the medicinal properties of various herbs, it is not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

By Cristi Nunziata, Herbal Education Coordinator

Inflammation is the body’s response to injury and infection or the result of autoimmune conditions. While in some cases the use of pharmaceutical and over the counter anti-inflammatory drugs may be necessary and should be considered on an individual basis, when a minor injury is to blame, pharmaceuticals can often be avoided by turning to herbal allies instead. Topical use of herbs, in the form of a compress, bath, homeopathic preparation, or infused oil or essential oil, is a gentle way to address inflammation while avoiding potential side effects of drugs or the internal use of herbs.

Fire Cider Controversy

Fire Cider ingredients

Note: These articles are not meant as a substitute for proper medical advice. Please consult with your medical practitioner before using any type of remedy, herbal or otherwise.

Fire cider is a vinegar infusion of warming herbs, such as ginger, horseradish, garlic and cayenne. It is a common cold and flu remedy, but can be used year round as a circulatory, immune, and digestive tonic. Shire City Herbals, a company out of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, was recently granted the copyright for Fire Cider, a traditional remedy that was neither created nor named by the company. They then issued cease and desist orders to companies that have been selling this product long before Shire City Herbals was created. Rosemary Gladstar has published the recipe for fire cider in several of her books and began teaching people how to make it over 35 years ago. Her teachings led to this remedy being made by thousands of herbalists over several decades.

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